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How GPS Phones Work

        Tech | Cell Phones

GPS Receiver Basics

Like a cell phone, a GPS receiver relies on radio waves. But instead of using towers on the ground, it communicates with satellites that orbit the Earth. There are currently 27 GPS satellites in orbit -- 24 are in active use and 3 act as a backup in case another satellite fails.

In order to determine your location, a GPS receiver has to determine:

  • The locations of at least three satellites above you
  • Where you are in relation to those satellites

The receiver then uses trilateration to determine your exact location. Basically, it draws a sphere around each of three satellites it can locate. These three spheres intersect in two points -- one is in space, and one is on the ground. The point on the ground at which the three spheres intersect is your location.

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A GPS receiver has to have a clear line of sight to the satellite to operate, so dense tree cover and buildings can keep it from getting a fix on your location.

GPS receivers and cell phones have a lot in common, and both are very popular. In the next section, we'll look at some of the features of GPS-enabled cell phones.


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