Like HowStuffWorks on Facebook!

How the Golden-i Works


It fits snuggly under a typical helmet, and it looks snappy with a suit. But make sure your tie choice fits the color scheme of your Golden-i computer.
It fits snuggly under a typical helmet, and it looks snappy with a suit. But make sure your tie choice fits the color scheme of your Golden-i computer.
Courtesy Kopin

Imagine that you're a firefighter commander heading to the scene of a conflagration of apocalyptic proportions. A hurricane of fire has trapped at least three people in a windowless office on the third floor. Your job is to get them out alive. But there are a lot of unknowns, like the layout of the building, the number of available firefighters and much more.

In order to make the best decisions on the fly, you need as much information as possible -- and you need it while you're at a dead run, with hands too busy for a laptop or tablet. Thanks to the Kopin Golden-i, you have the power of a computer right on your head.

Golden-i is a wearable computer that has all of the elements of a regular computer contained within a head-mounted device. There's flash-memory storage, a CPU, RAM and a display, along with options for wireless networking. To control Golden-I, you use both voice commands and head gestures.

Kopin stresses that this isn't a computer for everyone. You won't code a new app or work on a financial spreadsheet using Golden-i. Instead, they say the computer is designed for information snacking, which is marketing-speak for a tool that allows you to jump around and collect information from a variety of sources and simultaneously and instantaneously communicate with your co-workers.

Kopin, which specializes in ultra-small displays for, is currently targeting Golden-I for large businesses and government agencies. They see Golden-i as a powerful tool for first responders, field service technicians, military operatives, medical professionals, security personnel, construction site managers and other people who work in time-sensitive and complex situations. But consumer-grade products might be closer to reality than you think.

Keep reading, and you'll see how Kopin managed to cram the power of a computer into a lightweight, skull-hugging profile. This melding of man and machine could change everything.


More to Explore