Cool Facts

  • With a 3-megapixel camera, you can take a higher-resolution picture than most computer monitors can display.
  • You can use your Web browser to view digital pictures taken using the JPEG format.
  • The first consumer-oriented digital cameras were sold by Kodak and Apple in 1994.
  • In 1998, Sony inadvertently sold more than 700,000 camcorders with a limited ability to see through clothes.

Digital Camera Basics

Let's say you want to take a picture and e-mail it to a friend. To do this, you need the image to be represented in the language that computers recognize -- bits and bytes. Essentially, a digital image is just a long string of 1s and 0s that represent all the tiny colored dots -- or pixels -- that collectively make up the image. (For information on sampling and digital representations of data, see this explanation of the digitization of sound waves. Digitizing light waves works in a similar way.)

If you want to get a picture into this form, you have two options:

  • You can take a photograph using a conventional film camera, process the film chemically, print it onto photographic paper and then use a digital scanner to sample the print (record the pattern of light as a series of pixel values).
  • You can directly sample the original light that bounces off your subject, immediately breaking that light pattern down into a series of pixel values -- in other words, you can use a digital camera.

At its most basic level, this is all there is to a digital camera. Just like a conventional camera, it has a series of lenses that focus light to create an image of a scene. But instead of focusing this light onto a piece of film, it focuses it onto a semiconductor device that records light electronically. A computer then breaks this electronic information down into digital data. All the fun and interesting features of digital cameras come as a direct result of this process.

In the next few sections, we'll find out exactly how the camera does all this.