5 Plant Photography Tips


4
Experiment With Scale and Landscape Shots
Even if the primary subject of your photo is close to the camera, framing it in the landscape that surrounds it can add depth to your shot.
Even if the primary subject of your photo is close to the camera, framing it in the landscape that surrounds it can add depth to your shot.
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Plant photography tends to make us think of tightly focused close-up shots of blooming flowers. Close-ups with strong depth of field are perfect for creating bold, striking images -- but sometimes it's worth stepping back and admiring the big picture.

Don't focus on a single flower; focus on an entire field, or an interesting array of plants, or a jutting rock covered with moss. Shoot at an interesting angle. Maybe that means getting up close to a flower, but shooting with a deep depth of field to keep everything in the background in focus. Shoot from a low angle to balance plants against the sky. In the right location, the scale of a landscape photograph can be more dramatic than the usual tight shot.

When shooting a landscape photo with a wide-angle lens, everything from the ground to the sky will be in focus. Usually, however, plant photography requires a shallower depth of field; the next tip is about distinguishing a flower from its background.