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Top 5 Myths About Yahoo

        Tech | Tech Myths

4
Yahoo Has Lost the Search Engine War
In 2000, Yahoo teamed with Medallion Financial to equip New York City cabs with Internet access.
In 2000, Yahoo teamed with Medallion Financial to equip New York City cabs with Internet access.
Chris Hondros/Getty Images

Google has officially reached godlike status. Year after year, its share of the total search market continues to rise. Some analysts report Google taking an astounding 74 percent of the U.S. search engine market in June 2009 [source: Patriquin].

Yahoo Search, on the other hand, grabbed a mere 17 percent of the search engine market that month. At first, that makes Yahoo look like the big loser. Then you notice who came in third: a humble mom-and-pop operation called Microsoft.

Microsoft has been trying to scrape together a double-digit share of the search engine market for more than a decade [source: Sullivan]. The company's efforts have had limited success: Despite pouring $80 million dollars into an advertising blitz for its revamped search engine Bing, it only took 6.5 percent of the June 2009 search market [source: Eaton].

Search engine analysts also point out that market share isn't everything. A more useful indicator, at least from a revenue-generating standpoint, is the number of raw queries made on each search engine.

Once again, Google is in a class by itself when it comes to raw queries. Google processed 9 billion queries in June compared to 2 billion for Yahoo and 799 million for Microsoft. The important thing to note here is that Yahoo's raw search numbers have remained steady -- up from 1.9 billion in June 2008 -- meaning it's not necessarily losing ground to Google [source: Sullivan].

Yahoo may be a distant number two, but the "big loser" slot is already spoken for.


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