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How the Bulova Precisionist Works

Precisionist Materials and Bulova's History
The clock atop Denver's Coors Field is a Bulova timepiece.
The clock atop Denver's Coors Field is a Bulova timepiece.
George Rose/Getty Images

As of Spring 2012, Bulova offered the Precisionist movement in six style collections ranging from sporty to dressy with prices ranging from about $300 to $900. For the most part, the collections target fashion-conscious consumers, with the major difference among the styles involving face shapes, engravings, colors and material selections. These range from slim stainless steel cases with leather straps, mother-of-pearl inlays and diamond accents to chunky titanium cases with ballistic fabric straps and carbon fiber inlays.

Most of the watches are water resistant to about 100 feet (30 meters) -- although one might find it hard to imagine taking the diamond-studded designs anywhere near a pool, let alone an ocean. The Champlain collection incorporates screw-back cases and extra gaskets to push the water resistance to about 900 feet (300 meters), making them suitable for use by divers [source: Bulova].

The Bulova Watch Company is employing new-to-the-market ideas in the Precisionist mechanism, but the company itself is no spring chicken. It has been in existence since 1875, and launched its first line of wristwatches in 1919 to respond to the demand of soldiers in World War I, who needed easier access to an accurate timepiece than could be had from a pocket watch. Bulova's wrist-mounted option caught on, and veterans brought the idea home from the battlefield.

Over the years, Bulova has had other firsts that go beyond watch making. In 1941, the company made advertising history when a commercial for its wares aired during a baseball game. Legend has it the company paid a whopping $9 for the commercial (for more on Bulova's commercial first, see our article 10 TV Moments that Changed the World). And the company's Accutron quartz-tuning-forkÔÇôregulated technology, which has been used everywhere from NASA satellites to the first moon walk to Air Force One, remains a solid contender in the watch market today.