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How TEEC EFLs Work


All Set for Electrets
These portable EFLs are slim and consume very little power, so they’re perfect for long trips.
These portable EFLs are slim and consume very little power, so they’re perfect for long trips.
Courtesy TEEC

Flexibility in a speaker is a novelty. In TEEC's EFLs, it all starts with that innovative plastic diaphragm, which can wobble and bend to no ill effect.

EFLs have diaphragms comprised of transparent, thin plastic (specifically, a type of fluoropolymer), which is referred to as the electret material. The word electret is a nifty blend of two common words: electricity and magnet. This so-called electret material is the secret sauce of EFLs because it maintains a semi-permanent (or static) positive electric charge, thanks in part to tiny pores (called nanopores) in the surface of the plastic.

Ultimately, this electret material has one important characteristic: Because of its inherent charge, the diaphragm doesn't need a lot of voltage to produce movement and thus, sound. Lower voltage requirements mean the stators and the diaphragm don't require the same stringent spacing demands of a traditional electrostatic speaker.

Throw in less rigid construction materials, and you wind up with floppy yet nice-sounding EFLs that are roughly 50 to 80 percent lighter than conventional speakers. Their low power requirements mean a small battery can provide enough juice for all sorts of applications that were simply not possible with speakers that suck down more electricity.

This electrifying electret technology seems tantalizing, but you might be wondering how a sandwich of metal and plastic can possibly produce quality music. TEEC is way ahead of you.


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