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10 Futurist Predictions in the World of Technology

        Tech | Future Tech

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Dark Networks
Members of Anonymous (seen here wearing Guy Fawkes masks) hacked the French presidential Elysee Palace Web site in early 2012, and  briefly knocked the FBI and Justice Department Web sites offline in retaliation for the U.S. shutdown of file-sharing site Megaupload.
Members of Anonymous (seen here wearing Guy Fawkes masks) hacked the French presidential Elysee Palace Web site in early 2012, and briefly knocked the FBI and Justice Department Web sites offline in retaliation for the U.S. shutdown of file-sharing site Megaupload.
Photo courtesy Vincent Diamante

As the world gets smaller by sharing more and more of the same cyberspace and social tools, we are, like it or not, becoming a bigger collective target for the bad guys. While our data puts us all "out there" in many ways, that same data enables those involved in dark networks and activities to get lost and take on false, covert identities in order to plan bigger and bigger attacks.

Anonymous is one such dark group involved in "hactivism," having found its way into sensitive stores of information from the likes of the FBI, Visa and Mastercard, and government Web sites from the U.K. to China, causing large-scale, disabling computer terror. It functions as a collective of many individuals and spreads its login and computer activities thin enough to lead authorities in too many directions to track, and its acts target everything from politics to commerce.

As incidents of cyber-attacks -- and even infrastructure attacks to water systems and electrical grids -- grow, billions of dollars are stolen and billions of people are at risk each year. This may lead to increased cyber-insecurity, or widespread fear of the very technology people need to go about everyday commerce and communication [sources: Fantz; IGF].


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