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5 Tips for Creating High-tech Family Traditions


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Innovating
Participating in old school science fairs can be ultra cool if you win a trip to the White House Science Fair. The 2012 fair was hosted by President Barack Obama, who's seen here pumping the "Extreme Marshmallow Cannon" invented by 14-year-old Joey Hudy from Phoenix, Ariz.
Participating in old school science fairs can be ultra cool if you win a trip to the White House Science Fair. The 2012 fair was hosted by President Barack Obama, who's seen here pumping the "Extreme Marshmallow Cannon" invented by 14-year-old Joey Hudy from Phoenix, Ariz.
Molly Riley-Pool/Getty Images

A source of pride for many families today is seeing the spark of ingenuity and interest in things technical among young people. Even when just one or two members of a family take an interest in dreaming up tele-transport systems or wiring a smart house with a central remote -- which may or may not work -- getting behind the aspiring minds can be a family tradition in itself. Making a student project or competition something the entire family gets excited about maybe even year after year gives kids confidence and older family members pride and some ownership in seeing the next generation grow up in a high-tech world.

Some organizations, such as FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology) continue the tradition of the science fair from generations past, but with a focus on getting young people excited about technology, math and sciences. Instead of the Styrofoam solar systems and cardboard rockets of decades ago, recent winners have designed prosthetic arms and robots. And, the U.S. president hosts the White House Science Fair celebrating the student winners of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) competitions from across the country.

Creating high-tech traditions around just being a techie may benefit the family and advance technology itself. You might even get to blow stuff up, in the name of science, of course.