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10 Tips for Scanning Old Photos


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Scan the Big Picture
That panorama's not so, well, panoramic when you're trying to scan it on a regular-size scanner bed.
That panorama's not so, well, panoramic when you're trying to scan it on a regular-size scanner bed.
iStockphoto/Thinkstock

Whether it's a picture of you surrounded by the cast of "Cats" or a breathtaking vista of dusk over the Grand Tetons, oversized photos are a terrific way to capture massive memories. But what to do when you can only capture the grandeur of the mountains or the excitement of seeing humans dressed as tabby cats in a small-scale scan?

Here's one solution: Scan several different sections of one large image and then stitch together the pictures for an impressive poster-sized presentation. When scanning a large picture, make sure to have about 30 percent overlap from one placement to the next. If the photo or image is really large, you might find it helpful to tape the sides so it stays in place. After scanning all the sections, use an image-editing program (like Adobe Photoshop or Windows Live Photo Gallery) to manually make each individual picture flow seamlessly into one image.

Speaking of editing programs, half the fun of scanning old photos is enhancing, repairing or retouching them. Let's scan ourselves to the next page to find out some handy tips for making old photos look like new.


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