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10 Tips for Scanning Old Photos


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Save Time With Batching
While we doubt you'll be able to scan this many pictures at once, scanning in batches will save you tons of time.
While we doubt you'll be able to scan this many pictures at once, scanning in batches will save you tons of time.
Hemera/Thinkstock

Depending on what kind of scanner you're working with -- and how new the computer or its programs are -- you might find yourself taking days to scan the boxes of pictures from your 1994 trip to Yellowstone. Instead of spending weeks resenting yourself for choosing to take a picture of every single wildflower and elk you saw, scan several photos at a time.

After scanning a few pictures at a time (feel free to cram in as many as will fit on the glass), you'll be left with one big, collage-type image. Simply crop out each picture manually, saving it as its own file. But remember: You certainly don't have to edit each picture as you go. By scanning plate after plate and then editing, you'll get all the pictures in quickly and then break apart individual photos or edit pictures on a need-to basis.

So you've worked your way through piles of pictures when you suddenly spot that gigantic, panoramic photo of you with the touring cast of "Cats." How can you scan the oversize photo for posterity? Read on to discover the tricks for keeping your memories (and "Memory") alive.


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